I’m going to come right out and say it. Teachers have not always been among my favorite people. It’s not that I have anything against teachers. After all, I’m a teacher myself.  No, my issue with teachers in the past was that they didn’t do much to see that my son’s needs were met in their classrooms.  Aside from the the one toxic teacher he had in third grade, my son’s teachers weren’t bad. In fact, some were good to him and I am forever grateful to them, but there was one teacher my son had who was exceptional and I want to say a special thank you to her.

janet-vThat exceptional teacher was my son’s preschool teacher, Janet Marovich. At the time, I didn’t fully appreciate her skills as a teacher because she was the first teacher my son had. Don’t get me wrong, even then I knew she was special. I just didn’t know how special. I knew that it took a special teacher to recognize the individual needs of every child in her care, but Janet made it look effortless.

Mrs. Marovich not only recognized individual differences among the children, she was also able to nurture the abilities she recognized. She could provide support for children who needed support and enrichment for those who needed enrichment. For example,my son was an early reader, and by age 4 was a fluent reader. Some of the other kids in the class needed help memorizing the letters of the alphabet.

Janet was able to provide my son and the other kids with exactly what they needed. She allowed my son to read the books he’d brought to school with him – and even suggested others to him – but she also managed to give the other kids the practice with the alphabet that they needed. None of the children felt left out. None were jealous of any of the others. Janet respected each child and every child learned to respect others.

It wasn’t until my encounters with some of my son’s other teachers that I realized just how difficult it was to do all that Mrs. Marovich had done. My son was often left to languish in a classroom while special attention was given to those children who needed extra help. He usually wasn’t even allowed to read what he was interested in while the other children were getting help. I was told either that “children that age can’t read” or that the other kids might think he was getting special treatment and would feel bad.

Janet and I kept in touch over the years. She was the first person to tell me that my son was gifted and she came with me to meetings with my son’s teacher and principal when he was in third grade to help me advocate for his needs. We even paid her a visit after she moved away and my son had graduated from Fort Leonard Wood after Army basic training and training as an MP (Military Police).  It has been a few years now since I’ve heard from her, but she will forever have a special place in my heart, not only because of what she did for my son, but also for showing me what it is possible to do for gifted children.

http://giftsforlearning.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/banner4.jpghttp://giftsforlearning.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/banner4-150x150.jpgCarol BainbridgeEducationNurturing Gifts and TalentsTeachers
I'm going to come right out and say it. Teachers have not always been among my favorite people. It's not that I have anything against teachers. After all, I'm a teacher myself.  No, my issue with teachers in the past was that they didn't do much to see that...